Persistence and transmission of Candida auris on and from gloves

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Interesting results from Jabeen et al. that many of us might have missed, as they are published in a mycology journal and not in an infection control journal.  Persistence of Candida spp. on latex and nitrile gloves was highest for C. auris and C. parapsilosis.  Interestingly, persistence on nitril gloves was generally less than on latex gloves. Transmission of Candida spp. from gloves (latex, nitril not tested)  to urinary catheter surface was most effective for C. auris and C. albicans.

To be frank, the chosen methods and set-up of the experiments leave quite some room for improvement, but the basic idea of the experiment and the message it conveys are – while not new – of importance: Glove use can be an important factor in the spread of all microorganisms, and in this case, especially C. auris.

Previously it has been shown that glove-use may negatively effect hand hygiene behavior. After years of focusing our attention on hand hygiene compliance and hand-rub technique, this publication is an important reminder, to not forget about adequate glove-use.

Jabeen K, Mal PB, Tharwani A,Hashmi M, Farooqi J. Persistence of Candida auris on latex and nitrile gloves with transmission to sterile urinary catheters.  Medical Mycology, 2019, 0, 1–5 doi: 10.1093/mmy/myz033 Advance Access Publication Date: 0 2019

Are we over-complicating effective hand hygiene technique?

The WHO method for hand hygiene is very well embedded as the ‘gold standard’ for hand hygiene technique. But is it feasible to perform every time in the busy clinical environment? A new study in Clinical Infectious Diseases seems to suggest that a shorter, simpler hand hygiene method be just as effective and more feasible in the real world.

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Working while sick

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Compared with the general population, healthcare workers (HCWs) have an increased risk of being exposed to respiratory pathogens including flu, causing a potential threat for their own health and their patients’ safety.  At present, the problem of HCW vaccination seems to get the main attention when dealing with influenza prevention, whereas the problem of HCWswho work while feeling sick, seems to be far less addressed.  That is, until recently when Chow et al. studied hospital-acquired respiratory viral infections, sick leave policy, and a need for culture change.

The ISAC Infection Control Study group had already piloted a survey on the topic and wishes to poll your thoughts with the present survey.

While there is nothing to earn, except of the good feeling of having helped someone, we kindly ask you to take the questionnaire (takes 4-5 minutes) and send it to others, including friends or family not in healthcare, as we are especially interested in possible differences.

Link for the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ISAC_Influenza

Thanks for helping and of course results will be back on this blog.

Must we screen for resistant bacteria?

This is a cry for help. In 2 weeks time I have a pro-con debate on the statement “screening for highly-resistant microorganisms is a must”. I face 2 problems: the organizers gave me the “PRO” position and my opponent is professor Andreas Voss.

We will be watched by a Dutch audience, so the bacteria involved are MRSA, VRE, anything resistant to carbapenems and ESBL-producing Gram-negatives, and I (and hopefully Andreas too) interpreted the question as “screening at the time of hospital admission”.

I am desperately seeking high-level scientific evidence supporting my allocated point. 

My question to the knowledgeable reflectionsipc readership is: What do you consider the single most convincing piece of evidence underpinning my case.

As in all good practice I will provide feedback (if I survive the battle).

Mapping C. dfficile hospital acquisition: short-stay diagnostic areas are important!

Recent genomic studies have concluded that hospital-acquired acquisition of C. difficile is rare, suggesting that acquisition of C. difficile outside of hospitals followed by hospital-onset disease is the most common explanation for C. difficile infection. These studies hinge on an assumption that in-hospital patient contact occurs due to shared or recent stay on the same hospital ward. A short publication in JAMA Internal Medicine eloquently challenges this assumption, suggesting that hospital contact that we would usually assume to be casual and not a risk for acquisition of hospital pathogens (e.g. short-stay diagnostic areas such as ultrasound and endoscopy) can be an important source of acquisition.

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Exposed: Dutch and London clinical microbiologists

Six weeks ago I blogged on the exposure of Dutch clinical microbiologists by Marcel Levi, former boss of the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and now leading 5 academic centers in London. Apart from describing his new “totally resistance-free” work situation, he criticized  the microbiologists in both countries for “not attempting to change the money-wasting and empty-brain practice of microbiological diagnostics”. Unfortunately, Marcel Levi is not just “another person” with an opinion. So, here are four suggestions to change his opinion, before all microbiologists have been sacked. Continue reading

Friday Afternoon: ATP vs UV vs eyeball Vs K9 and Going Commando in Surgery

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 12.26.42Well I was looking for a Friday afternoon sort of post and you know when you wait a while and two come at once?.. So firstly, some may recall that I have previously highlighted the utility of a sensitive nose in detecting a variety of things in a previous post. In a study just posted online first in the Journal of Hospital Infection, a springer spaniel was trained to detect C. difficile in the environment with a fair degree of success, especially for detecting rooms in which C. difficile was not present. Continue reading