An eclectic collection of resources for World Sepsis Day 2017

It’s World Sepsis Day 2017! In support of this, I’ve pulled together a few resources that I have found helpful. Starting with a very general overview of sepsis, which I quite like (apart from ‘the bloodstream carrying death around the body’, which is a metonomical step too far for me)!

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What makes a tweet fly at conferences?

A study just published in ICHE investigates tweeting activity at several IPC / ID / AMR conferences (the 2016 editions of IPS, ID Week, FIS/HIS, and ACIPC). Perhaps the most interesting finding is that including a weblink or tweeting on certain topics (including C. difficile and the media) increase the chances of a tweet being retweeted, whereas, surprisingly, including a picture reduces the changes of a tweet being retweeted.

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Hand hygiene compliance: we’re kidding ourselves

I’d like to direct your attention to a flurry of fairly recent correspondence in the Journal of Hospital Infection around whether the high levels of hand hygiene compliance commonly reported in England are realistic and useful.1-5

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Looking back on a CPE plasmid attack in the Northwest of England

A genomic study of 44 isolates of CPE from various species identified between 2008 and 2010, mainly from the Northwest of England, has concluded that plasmids played a key role in the early dissemination of CPE.

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SSIs – time to de-invest in laminar flow?

Laminar flow is a very embedded technology for the prevention of SSI in some types of surgery (especially hip and knee arthroplasty). However, it seems from a recent Lancet ID review that this widely adopted practice is way ahead of the evidence supporting it: the bottom line finding of the review is we should stop wasting time and money on laminar flow theatres for some procedures, and focus on basic prevention initiatives (especially getting antibiotic prophylaxis right) in all surgical categories.

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More coffee = less AMR?

This one is for lovers of the brown stuff (no, the other brown stuff). I was taken by a large impressive epi study published in AIM showing that coffee consumption is associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Part of this seems to be tied up in a modified inflammatory response. Whilst the study didn’t mention infection specifically, clearly infection and inflammation are closely linked. So, this got me to asking whether anybody has looked at coffee consumption and infection / AMR outcomes?

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