What urine can tell you

Urine should not be seen as a useless excretion product. Doping experts know, as do clinical microbiologists. In two recently published studies zillions of urine cultures were drained from computer systems and linked to primary care data, yielding very interesting findings. One study from Israel quantified the effects of direct and indirect fluoroquinolone use on antibiotic resistance in E. coli, see also our comments to that study. The second comes from the UK, the country that has an ambition to reduce Gram-negative bacterial bloodstream infection rates by 50%, because of increasing BSI rates. This study may provide both the reason for the problem and the direction to meet that ambition. Continue reading

Advertisements

“Why Dutch hospitals are so good at beating superbugs”

It is with great pleasure that I ask your attention for this article that appeared in the Economist. Yes, we still have low resistance rates in our hospitals and if you’re interested in how that happened, read it. The prosaic composition contains two parts; a very realistic thriller-like opening, followed by a second part with a rather unrealistic explanation. Both parts are separated by a short sentence of absolute nonsense. Time for a review. Continue reading

AMR deaths in Europe (part 2)

“33000 people die every year due to infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria” this is what ECDC released on Nov 6, 2018, on their website. “Superbugs kill 33,000 in Europe every year” said CNN and the same wording was used (in Dutch) by our Telegraaf. Naturally, the headings were based on the ECDC study published that day in Lancet ID, which happened to be the most downloaded paper ever of the journal. But was this really what was published? Valentijn Schweitzer and I got lost in translation when trying to answer that question. Continue reading

AMR deaths in Europe & America

Just before Christmas a follow-up on that what bothers us most: patients dying because of antibiotic resistance. I previously tried, see here, to disentangle from the ECDC study (33.000 deaths per year in Europe) how they got to 206 AMR casualties in the Netherlands and ended with a recommendation to not “focus too much on the absolute numbers as they may not be very precise.” With Valentijn Schweitzer I spent some more time in the 200 pages supplement, only to find out – in the end – that the Americans do these kind of studies much better. Continue reading

Fighting AMR: Close schools and use antibiotics

The global dynamics of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are extremely complex, but we usually focus on the selective pressure created by antibiotic consumption and spread of resistant strains. The brave ones amongst us (or the ignorant) try to disentangle all the facets of global AMR dynamics, and even attempt to quantify the relative contribution of each of these factors. Well, some brave investigators tried to do just that and published their findings in Lancet Planet Health. Perfect Journal Club material. Continue reading

AMR deaths in Europe

“In case of an emergency check your own pulse first”, that’s one of the rules of the House of God. More than 33.000 deaths due to AMR in Europe per year, as reported yesterday, definitely is an emergency. Therefore, I tried to disentangle what that means for my small country that so vividly tried to keep these superbugs out of the country. Continue reading

What about E. coli ST131 (part 2); is it foodborne?

Last November I blogged on E. coli ST131, frequently portrayed as a pandemic clone, combining hypervirulence, ciprofloxacin resistance and ESBL production. The question is whether the undeniable high prevalence of this bug among clinical isolates results from its virulence and antibiotic resistance or whether it is just a reflection of carriage prevalence in the general population, without any relationship to virulence or resistance. Two recently published studies try to shed new light on the debate; one bringing in chicken retail meat as the source…… Continue reading