How to predict ESBL (part 3)

Six weeks ago I introduced the ESBL-predict study that Tim Deelen from our group coordinates. Every hospital in the world can participate through a user-friendly electronic CRF (in a secured environment). My blog-invitation to particpate worked and some sites already started. In June >1,000 episodes were entered! Here is a short update and info for those that want to join.  Continue reading

The rocket-science of a CPE screen & isolate policy

Last weeks’ blog from Jon Otter on the practice of CPE screening and isolation raised some interesting comments (on twitter) emphasizing the difficulties in policy making for infection control. The two comments that struck me were: (1) … screening for CPE sounds logical “but does it work in long-term care facilities with high-levels of endemicity?” And “I use it in my hospital, but face difficulties in convincing others because of lacking scientific evidence for CPE.” Continue reading

Water, water everywhere (or nowhere?)

Karakum-Desert-Turkmenistan.-Author-David-Staney.-Licensed-under-the-Creative-Commons-AttributionA new paper by Hopman and colleagues (Andreas is also another author but is being modest) has evaluated the effect of removing sinks from the ICU. The trigger for this intervention was an outbreak caused by an ESBL-Enterobacter that could be related to contaminated sinks. The study looked at what happens if you remove all water sources from the ICU, and all water-related activities were migrated to a tap water-free solution. Continue reading

Looking back to see the post-antibiotic era

Now online in Lancet ID an impressive and important retrospective study describing the faith of 437 patients with BSI caused by carbapenamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). When scanning the conclusions of your weekly diarrhea of new papers (as I do) this one might have escaped your attention: (in short) “Appropriate therapy is good. Combination therapy too. Patients with BSIs due to CPE should receive active therapy.” Yet, there is much more interesting stuff in this paper. Continue reading

Chinese carbapenamases: Fly like an eagle

I blogged on mcr-1 (colistin resistance) in China last week, to share the latest reassuring data. Well, the paper on which todays’ blog is printed will be used to wrap tomorrows’ market fish (typical Dutch expression). Nicolle Stoesser (Oxford) send me the latest news, coming from a Nature Microbiology study providing evidence for the potential of spread of carbapenamases by flies and birds. Not reassuring at all, and potentially with major consequences. Continue reading

Colistin resistance and mortality

 

My previous blog on “mcr-1 and the end of the world” evoked responses on the important effects of colistin resistance on patient outcome, referring to a new study in CID with the following abstract closure: “Importantly, mortality was increased in patients with colistin-resistant isolates.” The wording is correct, but I’m afraid that it will be interpreted incorrectly. Continue reading

Mcr-1 and the end of the world

If you read this, you may well be concerned about antibiotic resistance and consider reducing the burden of disease caused by AMR as one of your professional goals. Broad attention helps us to fight the problem: it creates awareness and funds for research. So, how do we cope with data that may jeopardize these ambitions (raising awareness fort he problem AMR)? Here is the eaxmple of mcr-1. Continue reading