CPE guidelines galore: ECDC and ACSQH join the party

I recently posted on the WHO CPE guidelines. A couple of people have alerted me to two other recently published guidelines, one from ECDC, and the other from Australian Commission  on Safety and Quality in Healthcare. So, we now have a wealth of guidelines to prevent and control CPE. But how to they compare?

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The prevention paradox: E. coli versus Klebsiella

The prevention paradox, as described in 1981, is the “seemingly contradictory situation where the majority of cases of a disease come from a population at low or moderate risk of that disease, and only a minority of cases come from the high risk population (of the same disease). This is because the number of people at high risk is small”, see. In our world this reflects the question how to prevent transmission of ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBL-EC) or K. pneumoniae (ESBL-KP), or both. A new study may help to decide. Continue reading

What about E. coli ST131?

One of the faces of the global antibiotic resistance crisis is Escherichia coli ST131, frequently portrayed as a pandemic clone, combining hypervirulence, ciprofloxacin resistance and ESBL production. A recent study in Genome Research, a journal you may not read every month, though, sheds a whole new light on this “superbug”. Continue reading

Mapping C. dfficile hospital acquisition: short-stay diagnostic areas are important!

Recent genomic studies have concluded that hospital-acquired acquisition of C. difficile is rare, suggesting that acquisition of C. difficile outside of hospitals followed by hospital-onset disease is the most common explanation for C. difficile infection. These studies hinge on an assumption that in-hospital patient contact occurs due to shared or recent stay on the same hospital ward. A short publication in JAMA Internal Medicine eloquently challenges this assumption, suggesting that hospital contact that we would usually assume to be casual and not a risk for acquisition of hospital pathogens (e.g. short-stay diagnostic areas such as ultrasound and endoscopy) can be an important source of acquisition.

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The importance of patient sharing between hospitals on MRSA transmission

In a remarkable quirk of academic publishing, two virtually identical studies by separate research groups in the UK (one in London, and one in Cambridge) published a week apart have come to the same conclusion: that we are missing a sizable portion of MRSA transmission by focussing solely on wards in a single hospital. A referral-network level view is required for an accurate picture of MRSA transmission. (You may have seen some press about the Cambridge article, e.g. on the BBC here.)

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WHO guidelines for the prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant organisms

WHO have just released some guidelines for the prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aerugionsa. This guideline builds on the excellent WHO core components for IPC guidelines.

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What’s going on during World Antibiotic Awareness Week 2017

It probably won’t have escaped your attention that it’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week (#WAAW). Here’s a quick summary of what’s going on this week that may be of interest. Please feel free to add to this shared resource in the comments section.

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