Reflections IPC pre-ECCMID event

“How do we communicate our scientific results, beliefs and doubts to our peers, policy makers and the lay men?”

Posting blogs on Reflections on Infection Prevention and Control is a possibility. For the occasion of the ECCMID 2019 meeting in Amsterdam, the “Reflections on IPC blog team” and UMCU PhD students invite you to this pre-ECCMID event, on the Friday before ECCMID (April 12th) in Amsterdam.

We have a high-quality entertaining program and hope to meet you in a most pleasant atmosphere. Jop de Vrieze is a prominent Dutch science journalist with a great interest in infectious diseases. He writes for Science, de Groene Amsterdammer and Volkskrant, to name a few. Miquel Ekkelenkamp is a clinical microbiologist with a PhD in day-time, but at night he writes (real) novels and razor-sharp columns. Muge Cevik is an infectious diseases registrar from the United Kingdom, who worked on an analysis of all the tweets sent during the ECCMID 2018 conference in Madrid.  Martin Kiernan, a Visiting Clinical Fellow at the Richard Wells Research Centre of the University of West London and distinguished IPC blog writer will present the top 10 reflections on IPC. And Rinze Benedictus from the UMC Utrecht will end the program with explaining the concepts of Science in Transition, an international movement to change several aspects of the current academic system, such as the pressure to publish as much as possible in journals with high impact factors, and where that all can lead to.

Now, since this all happens in the Netherlands we must obey to Dutch rules. One of them is that you need to sign up and pay €25,– AIOS/PhD and €45,–. for medical specialists. This is an evidence-based intervention to reduce the “no-show rate” from 80% (with free entrance) to at most 10%, and to prevent us ending the evening with loads of uneaten “bitterballen”. We can host about 70 guests!

Venue: Cafe Weesper, Weesperzijde 144, Amsterdam

18.00-19.00     Wellcome
19.00-19.20     Jop de Vrieze: Science and communication
19.20-19.40     Miquel Ekkelenkamp: the art of science
19.40-20.00     Muge Cevik: Science in tweets
20.00-20.30     Break with Dutch cuisine and drinks
20.30-20.50    Martin Kiernan: The Top Ten Reflections on IPC
20.50-21.15    Rinze Bendictus: Science in Transition

Happy gathering. Hope to see you there.

You can sign in here: https://webshop.umcutrecht.nl/umcutrecht/nl/Products.aspx

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