AMR deaths in Europe

“In case of an emergency check your own pulse first”, that’s one of the rules of the House of God. More than 33.000 deaths due to AMR in Europe per year, as reported yesterday, definitely is an emergency. Therefore, I tried to disentangle what that means for my small country that so vividly tried to keep these superbugs out of the country. Continue reading

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What about E. coli ST131 (part 2); is it foodborne?

Last November I blogged on E. coli ST131, frequently portrayed as a pandemic clone, combining hypervirulence, ciprofloxacin resistance and ESBL production. The question is whether the undeniable high prevalence of this bug among clinical isolates results from its virulence and antibiotic resistance or whether it is just a reflection of carriage prevalence in the general population, without any relationship to virulence or resistance. Two recently published studies try to shed new light on the debate; one bringing in chicken retail meat as the source…… Continue reading

An endless one-sided confidence in Pip-tazo?

This weeks’ publication of the highly controversial results of the MERINO trial in JAMA caused quite a stir on social media. The paper has been viewed >50,000 times and the unexpected outcome has been challenged by many. But what was the conclusion in JAMA? “Among patients with E. coli or K. pneumoniae bloodstream infection (BSI) and ceftriaxone resistance, definitive treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam compared with meropenem did not result in a non-inferior 30-day mortality.” Not and  in the same sentence, a doubled denial, is confusing. More important, as formulated, the study was inconclusive, which nobody seems to accept. We dived into the depths of the reporting and then tried to explain it. Continue reading

The antipathy against SDD explained

With the first paper on Selective Digestive Decontamination in ICU patients published in 1983, this year marks the 35th anniversary of one the fiercest controversies in intensive care medicine, infection prevention and clinical microbiology. To celebrate this, Intensive Care Medicine published 3 editorials called the “Antipathy against SDD is justified”: 1 arguing Pro, 1 Con and 1 wasn’t sure. If the contents of these editorials had been patients, a (good) physician would have called them “diagnostic”. SDD is where clinical epidemiology becomes psychology and sociology. Continue reading

Attacking the fecal veneer (part 2)

Last year (Jan 17, 2017) I blogged on an excellent pragmatic cluster-randomized crossover study in which 4 patient room cleaning strategies were tested for their effectiveness to reduce acquisition of bacterial carriage for the incoming patients. The authors’ conclusion was that “enhanced terminal room disinfection decreases the risk of pathogen acquisition”, which I interpreted as “Not for C. diff, may be for MRSA and yes for VRE.” Now the same group published the effects of these interventions on infection/colonization with these pathogens in ALL patients admitted to the hospital during the study period, see. Authors’ conclusion this time: “Enhanced terminal room disinfection with UV in a targeted subset of high-risk rooms led to a decrease in hospital-wide incidence of C difficile and VRE.” Really? Continue reading

Antibiotic resistance after the toilet is flushed

Last week Jon ended his reflection with a grade A recommendation to close the toilet lid before flushing, as the best way to minimize the potential impact of “toilet flushing plumes”. Even better: do not flush at all. This week we take it from there, in a discovery of what happens subsequently. Let’s take the loo with the highest likelihood of being soiled with antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs): the hospital loo. Elena Buelow, former Phd student in our group and now post-doc in Limoges, France, quantified how hospital sewage contributes to the quantity and diversity of ARGs in the general sewerage system. The work was published on-line today.
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Fosfomycin: the hottest drug in town!? News from ECCMID 2018

In our team Thijs ten Doesschate does a PhD in clinical epidemiology addressing some clinical aspects on fosfomycin; An old antibiotic, active against Enterobacteriaceae, and surfacing as promising alternative to beta-lactams and fluoroquinolones in times of antibiotic resistance. He is currently coordinating a multi-center double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial to determine non-inferiority of fosfomycin (against ciprofloxaxin) in the step-down oral treatment of complicated Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). If non-inferior, we could reduce cipro usage. For himself (and now for us) he summarized fosfomycin news at ECCMID. Most presentations (O) and posters (P) can also be found on http://www.eccmidlive.org/ .

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