The role contaminated surfaces in COVID-19 transmission: a HIS audience-led webinar

The next instalment of the HIS audience-led webinar series is on the role of contaminated surfaces in COVID-19 transmission. I was delighted to be part of the panel for this one:

  • Dr Lena Ciric – Associate Professor in Environmental Engineering, University College London
  • Dr Stephanie Dancer – Consultant Microbiologist, NHS Lanarkshire and Professor of Microbiology, Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland
  • Dr Manjula Meda – Consultant Clinical Microbiologist and Infection Control Doctor, Frimley Park Hospital
  • Dr Jon Otter – Infection prevention and control Epidemiologist, Imperial College London
  • Chair: Dr Surabhi Taori, Consultant microbiologist and infection control doctor, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Here’s the recording:

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Update on 2019-nCoV: part 11 – where will it end?

I’m sure we’ve all been following the emerging story of the 2019-nCoV outbreak closely, with the third cases reported in the UK yesterday (pleased to see this is where you’d expect the UK to be based on Marc’s post earlier)! There’s been a small explosion of publications in the peer reviewed literature. I’ve chosen one slightly randomly to discuss today: a short modelling study providing some insight on the likely volume of unreported cases (very much the ice berg and not the tip!) and some sense of where this outbreak will end (it depends on how we respond, globally).

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Update on 2019-nCoV: part 8 – ‘silent’ transmission

One of the key questions that we posed when this virus first emerged was is ‘silent’ transmission (that is transmission to others before symptoms become apparent) possible? And if it’s possible, is it the norm? A short letter published in yesterday’s New England Journal of Medicine answers the first part of that: silent transmission of 2019-nCoV is possible – but just how common is it?

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Update on 2019-nCoV: part 6 (winging its way around the world)?

I am interested, selfishly, in understanding the risk to Europe presented by the novel coronavirus (which now has a “working” name: 2019-nCoV; catchy isn’t it?!). It seems likely that there will be more imported cases, and possibly also some limited cross-transmission in Europe over the coming weeks.

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Novel coronavirus outbreak: an update

I posted at the beginning of last week about the emergence of the as-yet-formally-unnamed novel coronavirus that has emerged in China. At that stage, it could have been a parochial anomaly in the annals of ID history. What a difference a week makes! Now we are looking at a rapidly emerging international outbreak!

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Can you GES which carbapenemase caused this CPE outbreak?

An unusual and interesting outbreak of CPE was published recently in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Several key points: don’t rely solely on a PCR detecting the “Big 5” carbapenemases (NDM, KPC, OXA-48, IMP, VIM) – at some point you need to test for phenotypic carbapenemase activity; WGS can really help us in unravelling complex transmission routes; and covert plasmid propagation within and between species is a reality.

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CPE has landed in East London

The team at Barts Health, one of the largest NHS hospital groups in the country, has published the findings of a point prevalence screen of all inpatients for carbapenemase-producing organism (CPO) carriage. Overall, 30 (3.1%) of the 977 patient tested were carrying 35 different CPOs (all but one of which were CPE). Risk factors for CPO carriage included hospitalisation abroad, any hospitalisation, and overseas travel (especially to India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh). These findings help us to understand an emerging picture of CPO in the UK.

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It (the flu) came from the desert

We tend to find that the flu season in Australia is an early predictor for the severity of the coming flu season in the Europe. And the early indications are the flu in Aus this year is bad – unprecedentedly bad. So, let’s get our flu vaccination campaign planning hats on!

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