AMR deaths in Europe & America

Just before Christmas a follow-up on that what bothers us most: patients dying because of antibiotic resistance. I previously tried, see here, to disentangle from the ECDC study (33.000 deaths per year in Europe) how they got to 206 AMR casualties in the Netherlands and ended with a recommendation to not “focus too much on the absolute numbers as they may not be very precise.” With Valentijn Schweitzer I spent some more time in the 200 pages supplement, only to find out – in the end – that the Americans do these kind of studies much better. Continue reading

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Fighting AMR: Close schools and use antibiotics

The global dynamics of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are extremely complex, but we usually focus on the selective pressure created by antibiotic consumption and spread of resistant strains. The brave ones amongst us (or the ignorant) try to disentangle all the facets of global AMR dynamics, and even attempt to quantify the relative contribution of each of these factors. Well, some brave investigators tried to do just that and published their findings in Lancet Planet Health. Perfect Journal Club material. Continue reading

AMR deaths in Europe

“In case of an emergency check your own pulse first”, that’s one of the rules of the House of God. More than 33.000 deaths due to AMR in Europe per year, as reported yesterday, definitely is an emergency. Therefore, I tried to disentangle what that means for my small country that so vividly tried to keep these superbugs out of the country. Continue reading

What about E. coli ST131 (part 2); is it foodborne?

Last November I blogged on E. coli ST131, frequently portrayed as a pandemic clone, combining hypervirulence, ciprofloxacin resistance and ESBL production. The question is whether the undeniable high prevalence of this bug among clinical isolates results from its virulence and antibiotic resistance or whether it is just a reflection of carriage prevalence in the general population, without any relationship to virulence or resistance. Two recently published studies try to shed new light on the debate; one bringing in chicken retail meat as the source…… Continue reading

An endless one-sided confidence in Pip-tazo?

This weeks’ publication of the highly controversial results of the MERINO trial in JAMA caused quite a stir on social media. The paper has been viewed >50,000 times and the unexpected outcome has been challenged by many. But what was the conclusion in JAMA? “Among patients with E. coli or K. pneumoniae bloodstream infection (BSI) and ceftriaxone resistance, definitive treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam compared with meropenem did not result in a non-inferior 30-day mortality.” Not and  in the same sentence, a doubled denial, is confusing. More important, as formulated, the study was inconclusive, which nobody seems to accept. We dived into the depths of the reporting and then tried to explain it. Continue reading

A POET with a sledgehammer

Imagine, the look on the face of that ambitious PhD student, each day screening six hospitals for patients with S. aureus endocarditis, opening the NEJM and seeing that the Danes randomized 400 patients with Infective endocarditis (IE). And then his supervisor rubbing in that these 400 all underwent two extra transoesphageal echocardiograms for study purposes, that there were zero losses to follow-up and telling him how many samples of blood were collected to analyze antibiotic concentrations. Luckily, he was scheduled for our Journal club, which allowed him to apply the “trias scientifica”. Continue reading

Gaming with non-inferiority in antibiotic stewardship

An early switch from IV to oral treatment is one of the pillars of antibiotic stewardship. Oral antibiotics are mostly cheaper, hospital stay shortens and thus also the risk of healthcare-associated infections. One problem: before we change our current practice, we must demonstrate that the new strategy is safe. The best evidence comes from a non-inferiority trial. Yet, that usually implies enrolment of many patients. The solution to that problem: put on your poker face when drafting your sample size calculation and hope for the best. Our Danish colleagues show how.  Continue reading