On the effects of antibiotic stewardship: I met a analysis

Yet another meta-analysis telling us that we are doing something very valuable: antibiotic stewardship (AS). Nobody wants to (or should) question that good AS is important for our patients, just as hand hygiene, being sober when working and following the latest professional developments. How nice would it be if we could reliably quantify the effects … Continue reading On the effects of antibiotic stewardship: I met a analysis

Effective stewardship: less antibiotic use and more hand hygiene

Rossana Rosa (bio below) writes a guest post, reflecting on this recent review and meta-analysis on the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes… The first reports on the effects of Antimicrobial Stewardship Programmess date back to the mid-90s, and the interest in them has taken off in the past decade.

Cross-specialty engagement with antimicrobial stewardship

Guest blogger Dr Tim Rawson (bio below) writes… With antimicrobial resistance taking its place alongside climate change on the global political agenda, the role of antimicrobial stewardship in healthcare has come to the forefront. Being a good steward of antibiotics goes beyond simply possessing the technical ability to maintain the effectiveness of antimicrobials. It requires … Continue reading Cross-specialty engagement with antimicrobial stewardship

Online antimicrobial stewardship course

I found out about a new free online antimicrobial stewardship course yesterday. The course is a collaboration between the the University of Dundee and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, and comes highly recommended. The course is designed for healthcare professionals. If anybody completes the course, I’d be interested to hear your feedback.

Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis: stewardship’s ‘elephant in the room’?

We are all pretty comfortable with the idea that we have used too many antibiotics in the past and now we are reaping the consequences. I think we are also all in agreement that we need to start using antibiotics much more rationally – and keep the big guns firmly on the top shelf, double-wrapped … Continue reading Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis: stewardship’s ‘elephant in the room’?

Procalcitonin-guided antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (part 2)

Two weeks ago I posted a blog about an impeccable NEJM study on the effects of procalcitonin (PCT) on antibiotic use in patients with lower respiratory tract infection. I stated that this RCT was one of the first diagnostic studies in this disease area targeting the correct patients and ended by an invitation to identify … Continue reading Procalcitonin-guided antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (part 2)

Procalcitonin-guided antibiotics for respiratory tract infections

Every day thousands of physicians worldwide are facing the dilemma whether “to treat or not to treat this coughing patient with antibiotics”. A test that safely discriminates a bacterial from a non-bacterial cause is the holy grail, and some feel that procalcitonin (PCT) is just that. Results from multiple – mostly European – studies and … Continue reading Procalcitonin-guided antibiotics for respiratory tract infections

The antipathy against SDD explained

With the first paper on Selective Digestive Decontamination in ICU patients published in 1983, this year marks the 35th anniversary of one the fiercest controversies in intensive care medicine, infection prevention and clinical microbiology. To celebrate this, Intensive Care Medicine published 3 editorials called the “Antipathy against SDD is justified”: 1 arguing Pro, 1 Con … Continue reading The antipathy against SDD explained

The inaugural Healthcare Cleaning Forum

Today was the inaugural Healthcare Cleaning Forum. The plan was to showcase some healthcare cleaning and disinfection science at the Interclean Conference in Amsterdam (which is a huge general cleaning show). I think we managed to create some awareness about the unique challenges of cleaning and disinfection in healthcare outside of the usual crowd.